This Week on One Detroit:

AAPI Story Series | Detroit Activist Group Takes Stock of Progress A Year After Atlanta Spa Shooting

When a gunman killed eight people, including six women of Asian descent, last year in the Atlanta spa shooting, Zora Bowens called her best friend Ceena Vang to check in on how she was feeling. Though Zora also began to notice a pattern in the nation’s latest mass shooting events: instances of violence escalating to mass murder. Feeling called to act and denounce these forms of racism against Asian Americans, Bowens and Vang created the activist organization Whenever We’re Needed and began holding rallies around Southeast Michigan.

This story also appeared in DPTV - One Detroit

RELATED: Check out all of One Detroit’s AAPI Stories here!

One year after the Atlanta spa shooting, One Detroit’s Zosette Guir and WDET’s Digital Editor, Dorothy Hernandez, sit down with the activist duo to reflect on the first rally they held and the impact they’ve had on the community. Plus, they express what it means to be creating and carrying on a legacy of activism together.

Facing the Music: Ukrainian Quartet DakhaBrakha Continue to Speak Out Against Russian Conflict

Music listeners and internet users across the globe may likely know the Russian band Pussy Riot, who were persecuted for fighting against political oppression, but what about the four-piece Ukrainian quartet with Detroit connections, DakhaBrakha? The quartet is also known for standing up against Putin’s regime and has continued to risk their safety to speak up and spread the truth as the Russia-Ukraine conflict continues.

RELATED: Searching for Truth in Lies: Ukrainian-Americans React to Russia Conflict, Misinformation Campaign

One Detroit’s Bill Kubota connects with WDET Radio Host and Concert of Colors Director Ismael Ahmed to learn more about the quartet’s connection to Detroit and the cultural significance of their music across the globe. Plus, Ahmed talks with DakhaBrakha’s Artistic Manager Iryna Gorban to hear what’s happening on the ground in Ukraine and how the quartet and other citizens are being affected by the conflict.

Author Rae Chesny Keeps Zora Neale Hurston’s Life, Stories Alive With ‘Dear Zora’ Book

African American author and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston has been regarded as one of the best writers of the 20th Century, with her works primarily centered around African American life in the South. Today her legacy continues to spread across the globe with the help of author and scholar Rae Chesny, also known as ‘The Zora Girl.’

In celebration of Women’s History Month, One Detroit contributor Stephen Henderson talks with Rae Chesny, who is currently writing “Dear Zora” and travels the world lecturing and presenting her research on Hurston. Chesny shares more about the interest she’s taken in telling Hurston’s story as well as the inspiration she found from Hurston’s life for her own writings.

Watch Now:

This week, One Detroit reflects on the Atlanta spa shooting and Stop Asian Hate movement that came as a response to it. We talk with the activist group Whenever We’re Needed about the progress they’ve made in Detroit. Then, we learn about the Ukrainian band DakhaBrakha, their protest music and their connection to Detroit. Plus, author Rae Chesny joins the show for Women’s History Month to discuss the legacy of Zora Neale Hurston.
Read Now at One Detroit.

Stephen Henderson is the Founding Editor of BridgeDetroit, and a former writer and editor for the Detroit Free Press, Baltimore Sun and Chicago Tribune. Winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Commentary,...

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